She Threds Story

For as long as I can remember I’ve absolutely adored tanks and camisoles. My drawers have always been full of these multi-purpose sleeveless staples. One of my earliest memories are excursions with my mom to a sock store in Santa Monica called Footsie. It was run by a woman who I affectionately called “The Sock Lady.” I loved the feel of cotton, and it was such a treat to comb through her gloriously vibrant and delectably soft socks.

Also on the edges of my memory are stories from my father.

Each summer, he traveled down from New York to help his grandparents in their cotton fields. It appears my love of cotton is multi-generational 😉 Like so many small farmers that are land-rich and cash-poor, Grandma Beulah and her family worked the fields from planting to harvesting. Today, while some of the original farm acreage remains an open, undeveloped land, much of it has been replaced with housing subdividisons. Sadly this not a unique tale. U.S. cotton farmers continue to struggle. More on that later.

Now for the kicker. In June 2021 I was diagnosed with breast cancer. If you haven’t gone through the ordeal of healing from surgery and rounds of targeted radiation, let me share a bit of that experience. You’re supposed to wear loose 100% cotton clothing next to your skin. In addition to soothing salves, your rawly sensitive skin needs soft and breathable layers of protection. The good news is that I had a bunch of tanks and camis already, but they didn’t quite work. Who knew it was so hard to find tanks made from 100% cotton grown and sewn in the U.S.? In my quest, I discovered the tank and camisole market was limited to just a few brands selling poorly made products. Really? A quality cotton tank isn’t that complicated. Use good materials and sew it like you care so it’ll last beyond a few washings.

She Threds Story

For as long as I can remember I’ve absolutely adored tanks and camisoles. My drawers have always been full of these multi-purpose sleeveless staples. One of my earliest memories are excursions with my mom to a sock store in Santa Monica called Footsie. It was run by a woman who I affectionately called “The Sock Lady.” I loved the feel of cotton, and it was such a treat to comb through her gloriously vibrant and delectably soft socks.

Also on the edges of my memory are stories from my father.

Each summer, he traveled down from New York to help his grandparents in their cotton fields. It appears my love of cotton is multi-generational 😉 Like so many small farmers that are land-rich and cash-poor, Grandma Beulah and her family worked the fields from planting to harvesting. Today, while some of the original farm acreage remains an open, undeveloped land, much of it has been replaced with housing subdividisons. Sadly this not a unique tale. U.S. cotton farmers continue to struggle. More on that later.

Now for the kicker. In June 2021 I was diagnosed with breast cancer. If you haven’t gone through the ordeal of healing from surgery and rounds of targeted radiation, let me share a bit of that experience. You’re supposed to wear loose 100% cotton clothing next to your skin. In addition to soothing salves, your rawly sensitive skin needs soft and breathable layers of protection. The good news is that I had a bunch of tanks and camis already, but they didn’t quite work. Who knew it was so hard to find tanks made from 100% cotton grown and sewn in the U.S.? In my quest, I discovered the tank and camisole market was limited to just a few brands selling poorly made products. Really? A quality cotton tank isn’t that complicated. Use good materials and sew it like you care so it’ll last beyond a few washings.

She Threds Story

For as long as I can remember I’ve absolutely adored tanks and camisoles. My drawers have always been full of these multi-purpose sleeveless staples. One of my earliest memories are excursions with my mom to a sock store in Santa Monica called Footsie. It was run by a woman who I affectionately called “The Sock Lady.” I loved the feel of cotton, and it was such a treat to comb through her gloriously vibrant and delectably soft socks.

Also on the edges of my memory are stories from my father.

Each summer, he traveled down from New York to help his grandparents in their cotton fields. It appears my love of cotton is multi-generational 😉 Like so many small farmers that are land-rich and cash-poor, Grandma Beulah and her family worked the fields from planting to harvesting. Today, while some of the original farm acreage remains an open, undeveloped land, much of it has been replaced with housing subdividisons. Sadly this not a unique tale. U.S. cotton farmers continue to struggle. More on that later.

Now for the kicker. In June 2021 I was diagnosed with breast cancer. If you haven’t gone through the ordeal of healing from surgery and rounds of targeted radiation, let me share a bit of that experience. You’re supposed to wear loose 100% cotton clothing next to your skin. In addition to soothing salves, your rawly sensitive skin needs soft and breathable layers of protection. The good news is that I had a bunch of tanks and camis already, but they didn’t quite work. Who knew it was so hard to find tanks made from 100% cotton grown and sewn in the U.S.? In my quest, I discovered the tank and camisole market was limited to just a few brands selling poorly made products. Really? A quality cotton tank isn’t that complicated. Use good materials and sew it like you care so it’ll last beyond a few washings.